Fenton Comm. for Animal Legal Defense Fund

Each week, The Examiner showcases an advertising campaign by a local company.

Client: Animal Legal Defense Fund

Job: Increase online membership by highlighting a lawsuit against a dairy ranch. The campaign was paid for by a grant.

Agency: Fenton Communications, San Francisco

Managing director: Parker Blackman

Other Fenton clients: Human Rights Watch, Equality California, UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, The James Irvine Foundation, River Partners, Education Trust West

Creative team: Mike Smith, vice president; Joy Engel, online account executive; Emily Dulcan and Keli Goff, media relations; Kien Tseng, designer

The plan: Bring consumer attention to the dairy industry’s practice of taking calves from their mothers after birth and housing them miles away in cramped crates.

The theme: “Free Baby Mendes”

The concept: An online and college campus campaign launching during the World Dairy Expo that reveals the practice, footage of the calves’ confinement, and dairy corporations who get their calves from Mendes Calf Ranch. More than 20,000 consumers have signed letters of protest, thanks in part to outreach to ally groups and blogs.

Mike Smith

Age: 32

Position: Vice president

Education/background: Colorado College (English/journalism)

What drove your development of the concept? To be catchy, we played off the common pop-culture slogans of “Free [fill-in-the-blank].” Images (real and described) of the calves and their conditions were key.

Working on next: A campaign for “green-collar” jobs for Green For All, a new Oakland organization working to lift people out of poverty through green economy jobs. And “Think Outside the Bottle,” Corporate Accountability International’s successful and ongoing campaign to challenge the corporate control of water.

businessBusiness & Real Estate

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read