Estate of slain reality TV producer's wife settled

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

The family of a reality TV producer accused of killing his wife in Mexico has settled a dispute with the woman's sisters over her estate, and all its money will be set aside for the couple's two young children, attorneys told a judge Wednesday.

The agreement ends years of fighting between the sisters of Monica Burgos Beresford-Redman and the parents of former “Survivor” producer Bruce Beresford-Redman, who remains jailed in Mexico.

The producer, his wife and children were on vacation in Cancun when Monica Beresford-Redman was killed and her body placed in the sewer cistern of the swank family resort where they were staying. The vacation was an attempt to save their marriage after Monica Beresford-Redman learned her husband was cheating on her.

The Emmy-nominated producer has denied he killed his wife, and his attorneys in both the United States and Mexico have said there is no forensic evidence tying him to his wife's death.

Her sisters contested Monica Beresford-Redman's will, which would have left her estate to her husband.

The couple's children are cared for by the husband's parents and will each receive a monthly stipend from a trust account, lawyers told Superior Court Commissioner Donald Cowan during a brief hearing Wednesday.

“Everything goes to the kids,” said Richard W. Petty, an attorney for Monica Beresford-Redman's sisters.

Bruce Beresford-Redman remains in a Mexican jail and is unable to receive mail from his family or lawyers, Petty said. A Mexican judge ruled last year that there was enough evidence for him to stand trial, but Petty said a date had not been set.

Bruce Beresford-RedmanCaliforniaCalifornia NewsMonica Burgos Beresford-RedmanSurvivor

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