Ellen Park & Kayla Lee: Peek at a new kind of club for kids

Two San Francisco mothers are opening a 10,000-square-foot interactive indoor playground and educational facility Wednesday they say will make life easier for working parents.

Ellen Park and Kayla Lee are best friends and the co-founders of Peekadoodle Kidsclub, located in the lower level of the Woolen Square Building in Ghirardelli Square.

The space is geared toward children five years and under and contains The City’s largest indoor playground, a toy boutique and hair salon. It is also equipped with an Internet cafe and gym for parents.

“We’re really trying to provide everything under one roof,” said Park, a former lawyer. “This place is for people who want quality service and premium classes for their children.”

Lee and Park were born in Korea and came to the United States at ages 7 and 6, respectively. They met through a friend while attending college in Seattle and became fast friends.

They discussed opening Peekadoodle shortly after becoming mothers. They found juggling family life with their jobs overwhelming, and wanted to make it easier for other working parents such as themselves.

Lee’s son, Peyton, is 3, and Park’s daughter, Faith, is 22 months old. Park’s brother is the vice president of a private equity firm, and between his financial assistance and donations from friends and family, Peekadoodle came to life.

The members-only club will offer several classes, including family yoga, tumbling, cooking and science classes. Parents are required to remain at the center during the duration of their child’s visit, which Lee says offers a bonding experience for families.

“When you watch your kids with other kids, you start to see the personality your child has,” said Lee, a former grade school teacher. “You understand how to connect with them better.”

Family memberships start at $2,000 a year for unlimited access to the facility. Classes are offered for an additional fee.

The club began offering day passes Monday to families wanting to try the facility and its programs before committing to buying a membership. The official grand opening is scheduled for Wednesday.

Park said the best part about the project is working alongside her best friend.

“It has just been perfect, from finding the location to finding the partner,” Park said. “It has been a win-win situation for everything.”

“I feel like there’s no limit to what we can do,” Lee agreed. “It’s not about the payoff. It’s fun.”

For more information on Peekadoodle Kidsclub, visit their Web site at www.peekadoodlekidsclub.com.

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