Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivers her concession speech on Nov. 9New Yorker Hotel's Grand Ballroom in New York City, N.Y. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)

Election is over but the Clinton emails keep coming

NEW YORK — You thought just because Hillary Clinton lost that the email releases would stop?

Wrong.

Judicial Watch recently received 508 pages of documents, including emails, that the conservative group says shows possible conflicts of interest between Hillary Clinton’s State Department and her husband, former President Bill Clinton.

Expect periodic releases of records to continue through 2018, even though many Clinton critics have moved on following Donald Trump’s victory.

Judicial Watch – as well as other groups, including Citizens United – and news organizations had filed numerous lawsuits seeking the emails of Clinton and her top aides while she was the nation’s top diplomat after their public records requests went unanswered.

The just released Judicial Watch documents stem from a 2013 lawsuit against the State Department.

“It is a scandal that the Obama administration stalled the release of these smoking gun documents for over five years,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said. “These documents show that Hillary and Bill Clinton’s machine sought to shake down almost every country in the world, from Saudi Arabia to desperately poor Haiti.”

Trump, who campaigned on appointing a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton, said after the election that was no longer a priority. In an interview on “60 Minutes,” he called the Clintons “good people.”

“I’m going to think about it … I don’t want to hurt them,” he said.

Some Democrats, including Clinton herself, have blamed her surprising loss to the FBI’s decision to open another investigation into her use of a private email system for government business in the closing days of the presidential race. She denied any wrongdoing. The case was closed with no charges filed.

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