Dying industry tries to regulate its way back into your life

Wasn’t Barack Obama going to change Washington? Because it really doesn’t get any worse than this:

The National Association of Broadcasters is lobbying Congress to stipulate that FM radio technology be included in future cell phones.

In exchange, the NAB has agreed that member stations would pay about $100 million in so-called performance fees to music labels and artists. Radio stations would be required to pay performance royalties on a tiered schedule with larger commercial stations paying more than smaller and non-profit stations.

Wow, this would be a lot like forcing all Americans to pay inflated premiums for full-service health insurance plans with ridiculously low deductibles. (Huh? We did?)

Anyway, the big broadcasters get what they want. The artists get what they want. The only guy not represented at this table seems to be the guy who’s going to have to pay more in the future for a heavier, bulkier cell phone.

Next up: FM radios in every toaster! FM radios in every laptop! FM radios EVERYWHERE. And they always have to be ON!

Beltway ConfidentialFM radionabUS

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