Deniz Bolbol: Finding a firm of the perfect size

During her 14-year career in the public relations industry, Deniz Bolbol has worked with diverse companies ranging from the high-profile Ketchum Inc., to smaller agencies such as the locally operated Eastwick Communications.

Bolbol was recently hired as vice president at MWW Group, a nationwide public relations agency with offices in San Francisco, and she now believes that she has found just the right mix of the big and small.

“I’ve been so impressed with the experience and dedication of the staff, but there is also a very fun, refreshing side here as well,” said Bolbol, who won an Emmy Award as an associate producer at San Francisco’s KPIX-CBS. “MWW offers the best of both worlds. The national presence of the company offers a wealth of resources, but this office has the intimate, personal feel and energy of a boutique.”

Bolbol will be in charge of MWW’s branding, green technology and corporate communication divisions — all areas she says align neatly with many Bay Area businesses.

“Obviously there is a strong link between San Francisco and the technology sector and green practices,” Bolbol said. “We feel like we have the qualified individuals here that can effectively promote these specific practices.”

MWW’s clients in San Francisco include Sun Microsystems (JAVA), the account that Bolbol works with the most frequently.

“Sun Microsystems is obviously a very well-known name, but we still have to approach them like they’re a startup,” Bolbol said. “That’s what makes public relations so attractive to me. It’s all about finding new ways to create awareness and new ways to educate the public about all the qualities our clients have to offer.”

Along with working on her corporate clients, Bolbol also plans on augmenting MWW’s San Francisco branch, which opened its doors just two years ago. MWW has offices in 10 other cities, but with its main headquarters in East Rutherford, N.J., the bulk of its business comes from East Coast companies. Bolbol is intent on creating the same kind of awareness on the West Coast that MWW boasts in the Northeast.

“I would like to stay with MWW for the rest of my career,” Bolbol said. “We’re still growing our reputation on the West Coast, and we look forward to the challenges and rewards of continuing that expansion.”

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