Danish submarine murder suspect admits to dismembering reporter

The Danish inventor suspected of murdering Swedish reporter Kim Wall has admitted to dismembering her body but denied murdering her, Copenhagen police said Monday.

According to a police statement, Peter Madsen offered a new explanation for Wall’s death, saying she died of carbon monoxide poisoning while onboard his submarine while he was on the deck.

Earlier, Madsen had claimed Wall died after being hit by a submarine hatch, but the results of an autopsy shared by police Oct. 7 did not shown any sign of fractures to the skull.

Wall, 30, was last seen on the evening of Aug. 10 on an amateur-built submarine belonging to Madsen as it left Copenhagen harbour. Her dismembered body was found on Aug. 21.

The new explanation to Wall’s death due to carbon monoxide poisoning was reportedly given in an Oct. 14 interview.

“We have asked forensics to look into this,” Jens Moller Jensen of the Copenhagen police told reporters.
Madsen is facing preliminary murder charges in connection with the death of Wall, whose body he admits he dumped at sea.

Madsen’s lawyer said he had voluntarily agreed to remain in pretrial detention until Nov. 15.
Police on Monday announced preliminary trial dates, saying the court case was scheduled to open March 8 and run until April 25.

Last month, Copenhagen police said they had found Wall’s head and legs while her arms were still missing.

Police were still searching for Wall’s arms in the Bay of Koge near Copenhagen, as well as the tools used to dismember her body, Moller Jensen said on Monday.

After seven days of diving, police were considering whether to deploy “sonar equipment instead of diving and perhaps again deploy Swedish cadaver dogs,” Moller Jensen said, referring to specially trained dogs that can pick up the scent of body parts.

The prosecutor has at a previous pretrial hearing disclosed that the torso was stabbed multiple times and there were marks from a saw on it.

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