D.C. government wastes millions on HDTV studio

It's pretty hard to sympathize with the District of Columbia's budget woes when you see stories like this one, from our own Michael Neibauer:

The District's cable television office squandered nearly $5 million designing and equipping a high-definition television studio that was ill-conceived and never built, a new audit finds. The Office of Cable Television partnered with Mason Production Services in early 2006 to design and build an HD studio at the agency's headquarters in Northwest…

But the deal with Mason was quietly canceled after 15 months. Most of the equipment remains in its original boxes. The deal “was not clearly in the interest of the District government, its agencies, and more importantly, the citizens of the District of Columbia,” the D.C. inspector general concludes in an audit released this week…Mason was paid $1.39 million and the city's cable television office spent another $3.5 million on equipment, according to the IG, to “derive the benefit of a higher resolution television broadcast picture of mayoral, D.C. Council and educational events.”

D.C., facing a deficit in the neighborhood of $300 million, is currently laying off teachers. Earlier this year, the District put a hiring freeze in place for cops, despite the unacceptable level of violent crime residents here suffer — two and a half times as much per capita as New York City, according to FBI statistics for the first half of this year. Yet bureaucrats are all too happy to take other people's money and spend it on boondoggles like this one, and like the $15 million in bonuses handed out in recent months to top city officials.

The more money government has, the more it will waste. After all, it's other people's money and so none of the decision-makers care as if it were their own. This is a problem that liberals still cannot wrap their heads around, despite the last seven decades of experience with big government.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

Just Posted

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

National Weather Service flood watch in the San Francisco Bay Area for Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021. (National Weather Service via Bay City News)
Storm pounds Bay Area, leaving over 145,000 without power: Closures and updates

Torrential rainfall causes flooding, triggers evacuations in burn areas

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Most Read