Confirmed: Voters rejecting union agenda

The Coalition for a Democratic Workplace issued an election day poll, the results of which further confirm that voters are not too keen on unions. Bear in mind that this is a poll commissioned by business interests, but I hardly think that means that the poll’s findings can be easily dismissed. Among the findings:

Would you be (ROTATED) more likely or less likely to vote for a candidate in the future if during the next two years he or she supports changes to federal workplace regulations that expand the influence and power labor unions can have over private employers?

32%    TOTAL MORE LIKELY (NET)
17%    MUCH MORE LIKEL Y
15%    SOMEWHAT MORE LIKEL Y
58%    TOTAL LESS LIKELY (NET)
18%    SOMEWHAT LESS LIKEL Y
40%    MUCH LESS LIKELY
4%    NO DIFFERENCE (VOL.)
6%    DO NOT KNOW/CANNOT JUDGE (VOL.)
1%    REFUSED (VOL.)

The poll also tested the public’s stomach for the Obama administration’s plans to stack the National Labor Relations Board with radically pro-union appointees:

As you might know, the National Labor Relations Board is comprised of five board members nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The Board is responsible with overseeing relations between labor unions and employers in the private sector. When hearing disputes, do you think that…

51%    EQUAL CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE INTERESTS OF EMPLOYERS AND LABOR UNIONS
30%    MORE CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE INTERESTS OF EMPLOYERS THAN TO LABOR UNIONS
12%    MORE CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE INTERESTS OF LABOR UNIONS THAN TO EMPLOYERS

The poll also asked about workplace regulations. Again, respondents were in favor of a hands off approach to employers:

Do you think it is more important for the U.S. Department of Labor to be focused on (ROTATED) loosening restrictions that make it easier for employers to create jobs OR creating more regulations and oversight on existing businesses?

65%    LOOSENING RESTRICTIONS THAT MAKE IT EASIER FOR EMPLOYERS TO CREATE JOBS
25%    CREATING MORE REGULATIONS AND OVERSIGHT ON EXISTING BUSINESSES
3%    NEITHER (VOL.) 1%    BOTH (VOL.) 4%    DO NOT KNOW (VOL.) 1%    REFUSED (VOL.)

Beltway Confidentialelection 2010pollUS

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