College professors again among Democrats’ most prolific and dependable donors

Got a kid in college? If the answer to that question is yes, odds are very good that your son or daughter is being instructed by a faithful contributor to Democratic congressional incumbents and candidates, according to a new study by the Center for Responsive Politics of 2010 campaign cycle political donations.

“Democrats are the primary beneficiaries of educators’ federal political donations. Employees at nine educational institutions or systems have collectively donated $100,000 or more to Democrats,” CRP’s Lauren Hepler reported.

Employees of the University of California Public system made their employers the leading academic institutional source of Democratic campaign contributions, Hepler said. So far in the 2010 election cycle, they have contributed more than $414,000 to Democrats.

Harvard was second, with 77 percent of the contributions from its employees going to Democrats, followed by Stanford in third, with 75 percent of contributions by its employees being given to Democrats.

The figures come as no surprise to veteran political observers, however, as employees at the nation’s top universities are the education sector’s most active political donors, Hepler said.

“Consider: Fifteen of out of 20 universities listed on the U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings of the top national universities also rank among the nation’s top 50 political donor institutions, based on contributions made by employees. (Nonprofit institutions may not themselves make political donations, although employees may do so individually),” she said.

“Three schools — Harvard University, Stanford University and Columbia University — rank in the top 10 of both lists. Employees at all three universities gave at least 75 percent of their collective political contributions to Democrats.”

For the rest of Hepler’s report, which appears on CRP’s Open Secrets blog, go here.

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