Chinese woman gets sent to labor camp for using Twitter

In case you'd forgotten, the communist regime in China is a bunch of oppressive monsters:

A Chinese woman has been sentenced to a year in a labor camp for retweeting a Twitter post that mocked Chinese protesters who smashed Japanese products during a recent demonstration, her fiance said Thursday.

On October 17, Cheng Jianping, under the username wangyi09, added a few words to a message written by her fiance, before resending it on Twitter.

Eleven days later on the day the couple had planned to marry, Cheng's fiance, Hua Chunhui was taken away by the police from his office in the southeastern city of Wuxi.

More details here:

The tweet was actually a retweet, sent by her fiance Hua Chunhui in the midst of anti-Japanese demonstrations in China last month. The original tweet urged the protesters to smash Japan’s pavilion at the Shanghai Expo; Cheng Jianping merely retweeted it, adding the words, “Charge, angry youth.”

That's right. In China, sarcasm is a crime punishable by a year in a labor camp.

Beltway ConfidentialChinafree speechUS

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