China censors New York Times columnist's blogging in less an hour

I've previously covered Tom Friedman's China fetish in some detail. Fortunately, not everyone at the New York Times op-ed page is blind to the injustices of that country's oppressive regime. Times columnist Nick Kristof opened a Sina Weibo account — Chinese microblogging site similar to twitter — just to see what would happen. The results were predictable and depressing:

This afternoon New York Times columnist and China hand Nick Kristof tweeted the following:

@nickkristof “I’m microblogging in China, trying to find what gets censored. If you’re on Sina, follow me, ??? , at http://bit.ly/fIXiK6 ”

I immediately followed him on Weibo, and sent out a message to my followers saying that he had joined to test what could and could not be said on Weibo, along with his Weibo name.

My weibo was almost immediately retweeted by Hong Huang, who has nearly 1.6m followers.

Soon after, Nick Kristof’s Weibo account disappeared. In total it appears he had the account for less than an hour.

And remember, in China sending a sarcastic tweet is enough to earn you time in a labor camp. I hope Kristof writes about Chinese censorship in more detail soon — it's a subject worthy of attention.

Beltway ConfidentialChinaNew York TimesUS

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