Chamber of Commerce losing friends by opposing cap-and-trade

I've been critical of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in the past for its support of big government. The nation's top lobby group considers Rep. Ron Paul of Texas the worst House Republican and Sen. Jim DeMint the worst Senate Republican, according to its voting scorecard. The Chamber was a leading lobbyist for the Wall Street bailouts, the stimulus, and Cash for Clunkers.

But, despite all the possibilities for climate profiteering, the Chamber has stood firm against cap-and-trade. And now it is paying the price.

The New York Times reports today:

Exelon, a power company that operates the country’s largest fleet of nuclear reactors, announced today that it would withdraw from the United States Chamber of Commerce because of differences with the chamber’s climate policy — making it the third major utility to do so in just over a week.

A nuke-fueled power company has obvious reasons to support cap-and-trade: putting a price on CO2 will disadvantage every other reliable source of power. But lobbying against Pelosi, Reid, and Obama also carries a political price. Don't be surprised to see more drop-outs.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

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