Can Michelle Obama win over Hillary's women?

During her walkthrough at the Pepsi Center, Michelle Obama was sizing up the massive multimedia display that will serve as the backdrop to her speech tonight.

With all the swirling graphics and colors, the video-charged podium threatened to distract from the slender, neatly dressed woman standing at the small wood-trimmed podium in front.

She stood with her brother, Craig Robinson, who will introduce her tonight, and her daughters Sasha, 7, and Melia, 10. The younger girl swatted down her sister's arm when she pointed at the bank of cameras on bleachers across the convention floor.

Sasha made an excited noise into the microphone before the little group was ushered back through the curtains behind the podium – disappearing back into the kaleidoscopic array of monitors behind the stage.

In her pitch to delegates tonight, Michelle Obama will be trying to stand out from distractions of a political nature.

The women who have come to town still smarting from Hillary Clinton's defeat and the perceived slight of Clinton being overlooked as a potential running mate to Barack Obama remain a strong presence here.

And across the way from Michelle Obama's venue, Republicans in their own opposition outpost are counting on a victory in the battle of the candidate spouses. They're talking about Michelle Obama's comments about her lack of pride in the country — or at least it's political process.

Said one Republican operative — “We'll take Cindy versus Michelle any day.”

Democrats, though, think that after a rocky start, Michelle Obama can get back on track tonight.

“She is very dedicated to him and the issues he champions and the issues that are critical to the Democratic party,” said Rep. John Lewis, of Georgia. “I think that will come through in her speech.”

Chief Congressional Correspondent Susan Ferrechio contributed to this report.

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