California woman ticketed for driving with Google Glass

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty ImagesGoogle Glass is displayed ahead of a discussion at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

A woman testing the prototype device Google Glass was ticketed in San Diego this week for driving wearing the glasses with a built-in computer and miniature display, in a case that has drawn the focus of technology enthusiasts on social media.

The driver was pulled over on a freeway for speeding on Tuesday evening. The police officer gave her a second citation for driving “with a monitor” in violation of state law, according to California Highway Patrol spokesman Officer Marc Hale.

The citation was issued on Interstate 15 in San Diego, he said, without identifying the driver.

In a post to social networking site Google Plus, technology entrepreneur Cecilia Abadie said she was the driver stopped by the California Highway Patrol on suspicion of speeding and she displayed her citation online.

“A cop just stopped me and gave me a ticket for wearing Google Glass while driving!” Abadie wrote in the post.

It was not immediately clear if Abadie was the first person cited for wearing Google Glass while driving, but Hale said he was not aware of anyone in California ever being cited for using the technology while behind the wheel.

Google Inc's eyewear Glass is not available for sale to the general public. The company is testing the product with the help of thousands of so-called Explorers who have been given early access to the technology.

On the technology website CNET, writer Lance Whitney wrote that Abadie's infraction “does pose a thorny legal question that police, judges and drivers will have to face as these wearable devices become more prevalent.”

Abadie, who is listed on LinkedIn as the founder and developer at technology firm 33 Labs in Southern California, could not be reached for comment on Thursday.

On her Google Plus page, a number of online commentators suggested that Abadie contest the ticket, with one person comparing her offense to having a cell phone in a pocket.

Others criticized Abadie for her alleged speeding. Her citation says the California Highway Patrol officer estimated she was driving 80 mph in a 65 mph zone.CaliforniaCalifornia NewsGoogle Glass

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