Business briefs: R.J. Reynolds markets to teen girls

Five U.S. senators asked the Federal Trade Commission on Friday to investigate what they say are R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.’s attempts to appeal to teenage girls with ads for its sleekly packaged Camel No. 9 cigarettes. R.J. Reynolds launched the brand in February. It says the cigarettes are aimed at adult female smokers, a market segment in which Camel has performed poorly.

Smithfield Foods Inc.

Federal regulators approved the largest U.S. hog producer and pork processor’s acquisition of Premium Standard Farms Inc. on Friday after determining that it would not harm competition or depress prices paid to hog farmers. The deal was investigated by the Department of Justice’s antitrust division, which had asked for additional information from the companies in November.

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