Big impact building for Defeat the Debt media campaign. Are GOPers listening re: post-election implications?

If you have been following the congressional campaign in recent months, you've probably seen or heard a series of television and radio spots encouraging citizen action to get Congress and the president to move against the $13 trillion national debt. The ads are the work of DefeattheDebt.com.

The ads are reaching a huge audience, according to Google, which recently noted:

“Defeat the Debt, a non profit group driving issue awareness of the national debt, has already reached over 1 million people by running In-Stream ads across the country. In some markets, they have even opted to run In-Stream instead of TV ads due to their effectiveness.”

But the Defeat the Debt campaign is not limited to the brief InStream pitches. The group has been buying radio and television time across the country. Again, the message about the critical importance of bringing the national debt under control is getting out to a lot of people.

Spokesman Richard Berman told The Examiner that the campaign thus far has produced these notables:

* Our television commercials have been viewed 88 million times.

* We’ve also been running these television commercials online through a network of video sites including YouTube and Google. These commercials have been seen 56 million times.

* Our kids “Pledge” commercial is in the top 5% of most watched videos on YouTube.

* Last month over 300,000 people visited www.DefeatTheDebt.com.

Numbers like those suggest further evidence that voters are hungry for candidates and office-holders willing to tell the truth about the magnitude of the debt and the difficulties that will inevitably attend facing it.

And how should it be faced. Well, the group has also begun airing this TV spot in selected markets. It illustrates the consequences of out-of-control federal spending, and the solution, all in a single spot:

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