Big Green Update: Opponents flood California with anti-Prop 23 agit-prop

Big Green environmental radicals are beside themselves over the prospect of passage of California's Ballot Proposition 23, the imminently reasonable idea of temporarily suspending draconian anti-global warming regulations until statewide unemployment dips below 5.5 percent for four consecutive quarters.

In a vivid demonstration of Big Green's immense campaign cash resources, their opposition effort to defeat Prop 23 is far out-spending proponents of the measure, according to The Los Angeles Times.

“So far, opponents of Prop 23 have raised $16.3 million, nearly twice as much as supporters of the initiative, which was launched by two Texas oil companies with refineries in California,” according to the Times.

As reported in The Examiner's recent Big Green series, environmental radicals spend millions of dollars in every election campaign, with 96 percent of its contributions going to Democrats and a sprinkling of RINO Republicans who support greatly increased federal environmental regulation.

Their massive effort to defeat Prop 23 illustrates Big Green's campaign power can also be focused heavily on state initiative and referendum measures.

The unemployment rate in California has been in double figures for months on end and critics of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 contend it would only worsen prospects for a state economy that was until a few decades ago among the five largest in the world.

Opponents of Prop 23 claim it would permanently suspend the law that requires a reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

For more on Prop 23, includng the full text and additional background information, go here on Ballotpedia. For more from the Times on the opposition funding, go here. For a comprehensive look at funding for both sides of the Prop 23 debate, go here on MAPlight.

In another indication of the frenzy with which Big Green organizations are attacking Prop 23, the League of Conservation Voters has added the proposition to its Dirty Dozen list of targets for defeat in November. The LCV rarely includes non-candidates on its infamous list.

The Hill quotes LCV executive director Gene Karpinski calling Prop 23 “the single most important race in the country.”

As part of The Examiner's Big Green series, Mark Hemingway detailed the immense success of the LCV in defeating public officials who oppose the radical environmental agenda.

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