Big Green is a profitable enterprise

“Do you have a minute to save the planet?”
Perhaps you've been asked this question recently on some Washington sidewalk by a young twenty-something. But where do you suppose the money goes if you accept his sales-pitch and make a financial pledge to his organization or one like it?
One possible destination for your cash: huge salaries for top environmental non-profit executives.
The chart below lists only the top beneficiaries of the Green non-profit culture. Among the honorable mentions is former Clerk of the House Jeffrey Trandahl, who made a mere $270,000 at the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in 2007. For the purpose of comparison, Fred Smith of the pro-business Competitive Enterprise institute, which deals mostly with envirnomental issues as well, makes just over $200,000.
 

The ten top-paid environmental executives

Name Organization Position Salary Retirement Plan/Deferred Compensation Total
Frederic Krupp Environmental Defense Fund, Inc. President $446,072.00 $50,102.00 $496,174.00
Carter Roberts World Wildlife Fund President $439,327.00 $47,067.00 $486,394.00
Frances Beinecke Natural Resources Defense Council President $357,651.00 $75,308.00 $432,959.00
David Yarnold Environmental Defense Fund, Inc. Executive Director $323,801.00 $41,972.00 $365,773.00
David Festa Environmental Defense Fund, Inc. VP West Coast $325,559.00 $35,313.00 $360,872.00
Stephanie K. Meeks Nature Conservancy Acting President $318,507.00 $30,866.00 $349,373.00
Larry Schweiger National Wildlife Federation President $309,579.00 $35,425.00 $345,004.00
Eileen Claussen Pew Center on Global Climate Change President $311,500.00 $23,599.00 $335,099.00
Rodger Schlickeisen Defenders of Wildlife President $254,947.00 $57,949.00 $312,896.00
William Meadows The Wilderness Society President $289,750.00 $18,715.00 $308,465.00

Source: IRS, 2007 data.

— With Amanda Kruse

Beltway ConfidentialUS

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