Bay Area CEOs consider global warming a threat

A survey by the Bay Area Council released Thursday shows 77 percent of Bay Area CEOs say they think global warming is a very or somewhat serious threat to the regional economy and quality of life.

Only 6 percent of those top executives surveyed April 11-27 in the nine Bay Area counties said the threat posed by global warming was “not at all serious,” Bay Area Council officials said. The Bay Area Council serves as think tank and lobbying group for local business issues.

“Companies are figuring out that global warming is a strategic business issue, not merely an ‘environmental’ issue,” said Gil Friend, CEO of Natural Logic, a strategy consultancy helping companies design and implement global warming strategies that build business value.

A super majority of 84 percent also said they supported the California Global Warming Solutions Act, AB 32, which would require California to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020.

Around one-third of Bay Area companies, 32 percent, report finding market opportunities related to global warming or greenhouse gas reduction, while 52 percent reported making changes in operations or policies in the last year in connection with global warming.

This trend was particularly pronounced among larger companies and among those in San Francisco, where more than half, 54 percent, reported finding market opportunities in connection with global warming.

“With one-third of our companies actively finding ways to profit from reducing greenhouse gases, the Bay Area is undeniably now the center of the clean and green business market,” said Jim Wunderman, president and CEO of the Bay Area Council.

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