Attorneys: Robin Williams’ widow, kids settle estate fight

Susan Schneider, from left, Robin Williams, and Zelda Williams arrive at the premiere of  "Happy Feet Two" at Grauman's Chinese Theater, Sunday, Nov. 13, 2011, in Los Angeles.  (Katy Winn/2011 AP)

Susan Schneider, from left, Robin Williams, and Zelda Williams arrive at the premiere of "Happy Feet Two" at Grauman's Chinese Theater, Sunday, Nov. 13, 2011, in Los Angeles. (Katy Winn/2011 AP)

Robin Williams’ widow and his three children from previous marriages reached a settlement in their legal fight over the late actor’s estate, attorneys for the two sides said Friday.

Jim Wagstaffe, who is representing Susan Williams, said his client will remain in the San Francisco Bay Area home she shared with Williams and receive living expenses for the rest of her life.

He said she also will receive a watch he often wore, a bike they bought on their honeymoon, and the gifts received for their wedding.

Meredith Bushnell represents the three children from previous marriage — Zachary, Zelda and Cody.

“I think they’re just very happy to have this behind them,” Bushnell said.

The settlement, which is subject to a judge’s approval, ends a bitter and public dispute following the beloved comedian’s suicide in 2014.

Among the items in dispute were watches, memorabilia, the tuxedo he was married in and photographs taken on his 60th birthday, according to court documents and previous statements by attorney Wagstaffe.

Susan Williams said in papers filed in December that the contents of the San Francisco Bay Area home she shared with Robin Williams should be excluded from the items the actor left to his children.

She also claimed some of her husband’s personal items were taken without her permission.

Williams’ three children countered that Susan Williams was “adding insult to a terrible injury” by trying to change the trust agreement and deprive them of items that their father clearly intended to leave to them.

The dispute resulted in several court appearances before a San Francisco judge and mediation.

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