Attacking the Chamber of Commerce as logical as birtherism?

Jake Tapper talks to David Axelrod about the Obama administration’s allegation that the Chamber of Commerce is using foreign money to fund the group’s political activities–a charge the Chamber denies. This part of the interview is pretty amusing:

TAPPER: But what do you say to people who argue you are demonizing an organization for a charge that nobody knows if it’s true or not?

AXELROD: Well I’m not demonizing the Chamber of Commerce. I’m simply suggesting to them that they disclose the source of the $75 million that they are spending in campaigns and put to rest, put to rest the questions that have been, that have been raised.

TAPPER: Isn’t that like the whackjobs that tell the president he needs to show them his full long-form birth certificate so he can put to rest the questions that have been raised?

AXELROD: The president’s birth certificate has been available to people.

TAPPER: The long form?

AXELROD: Someone once in the course of this debate about whether we should have a law to force these organizations to disclose where they’re money is coming from in the campaigns, someone said, and I think they’re right – “the only people who want to keep things secret are folks who have something to hide.” If the Chamber doesn’t have anything to hide about these contributions, and I take them at their word that they don’t, then why not disclose? Why not let people see where their money is coming from?

Read the whole interview here.

Beltway ConfidentialbirthersChamber of CommerceUS

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