Argentina's Cristina Fernandez sworn in 2nd time

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez took the oath of office for the second time in her life Saturday, the only female leader in Latin America to ever be re-elected.

Fernandez, 58, held back tears as she pledged before Congress and a gathering of foreign dignitaries to honor the constitution and the memory of her late husband, former President Nestor Kirchner.

“I swear to God, the country and the blessed saints to carry out the office of the president and to honor … the Argentine constitution,” said Fernandez, who wore a black dress with a wide belt and sleeves of transparent lace — mourning garb of the kind she has used on many occasions since Kirchner's death in October 2010.

“If I don't, then let God, the country and him take me to task for it,” the president added, her voice cracking with emotion as she referred to Kirchner.

After accepting the wooden presidential baton decorated with a gold-and-silver version of Argentina's national shield, Fernandez remarked, “This is not an easy day. … Despite the joy, there is something and someone missing.”

The president entered the House of Deputies accompanied by her children, Maximo and Florencia, and received the baton from Florencia.

Fernandez reviewed a litany of accomplishments during her first term, including policies that have led to the resumption of trials for former officials accused of rights violations during the country's last military dictatorship, which lasted from 1976 to 1983.

She said that she hopes by the time she leaves office in 2015 the country “will have closed the book” on dictatorship-era human rights violations.

Fernandez and outgoing Economy Minister Amado Boudou, who assumed the office of vice president, took their oaths before outgoing Vice President Julio Cobos, who has distanced himself from Fernandez over the past two years. Government officials had questioned whether Cobos would show up.

Foreign dignitaries attending the inauguration included female Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff; the presidents of Bolivia, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay and Uruguay; U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, and President Barack Obama's senior adviser on Latin America, Daniel Restrepo.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez had planned to attend, but canceled at the last minute, citing the need to attend to the needs of citizens in his own country who had been affected by heavy rains that led to flooding and mudslides and claimed the lives of at least eight people.

The 57-year-old president had a cancerous tumor removed from his pelvic region in June and underwent four rounds of chemotherapy. He has said that he is now cancer-free. Venezuelan Foreign Minister Nicolas Maduro attended the inauguration in his place.

Government and politicsInaugurationsnewsUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Small, impassioned crowd celebrates the Fourth of July with protest for affirmative action

Lawmakers and marchers urge voters to pass Proposition 16 in the November ballot

Union threatens legal action after Police Commission expands use-of-force policy

San Francisco’s police union is pursuing legal action after the Police Commission… Continue reading

Giants announce health guidelines for Oracle Park

The San Francisco Giants announced Friday that the organization’s maintenance team will… Continue reading

Restorative art on the inside and out

Curator Ericka Scott organizes exhibition of works by prisoners

City Attorney seeks to recoup ‘illegal profits’ gained by Walter Wong through city contracts

San Francisco will seek to recover “illegal profits” gained by well-known permit… Continue reading

Most Read