Apple no longer green, city concludes

Stephen Lam/ReutersCity officials announced Monday that future purchases of Apple desktops and laptops by municipal agencies are not compatible with The City’s policy of buying green.

Stephen Lam/ReutersCity officials announced Monday that future purchases of Apple desktops and laptops by municipal agencies are not compatible with The City’s policy of buying green.

City officials announced Monday that future purchases of Apple desktops and laptops by municipal agencies are not compatible with The City’s policy of buying green.

After Apple stopped participating in a voluntary registry of green electronics known as EPEAT, the San Francisco Department of Environment said it would order all 50 city agencies to stop purchasing Apple products because they no longer comply with city purchasing guidelines.

EPEAT, an environmental rating system designed to make it easy to find and promote environmentally friendly products, endorses electronic goods designed and built to increase energy efficiency and make recycling easier. A coalition of environmental groups, government agencies, and manufacturers, including Apple, was responsible for creating EPEAT’s criteria.

Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet said Apple is expanding beyond the outdated EPEAT system.

“All of our products meet the strictest energy efficiency standards backed by the US government,” Huguet said.

“We also lead the industry by reporting each product’s greenhouse gas emissions on our website, and Apple products are superior in other important environmental areas not measured by EPEAT, such as removal of toxic materials.”

Chris Geiger, the manager of green purchasing at San Francisco’s Department of Environment, told the publication CIO Journal that The City’s decision could influence officials in other California cities to take similar action.

“In terms of purchasing power it’s just a drop in the bucket,” Geiger said. “But there are a lot of cities and counties who will do what San Francisco does.”

ssaya@sfexaminer.com

ApplebusinessChris GeigerSan Francisco Department of EnvironmentScience & Technology

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