And now from the same AARP folks who helped bring you Obamacare – a 13 percent health insurance premium increase

Among President Obama's key allies in selling Obamacare was the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), the 40-million member liberal non-profit advocacy group that spent millions of dollars from its members – many of whom are anybthing but liberal – on a multi-media campaign to help the White House.

One of the key planks in the Obama campaign was his constantly repeated promise that health insurance costs would not go up after Obamacare became law and that people who like their current coverage will be able to keep it.

In the months since, multiple private sector employers, including Boeing, MacDonalds, and others, have announced either major premium increases or plans to do away with their health insurance programs all together.

Now along comes AARP announcing an eight to 13 percent hike in its health insurance policy premiums charged to more than 4,500 employees, retirees and dependents. And that's likely only the first of more such increases to come. There are also “adjustments” coming in the AARP plan's required co-payments and deductibles.

For more on the AARP move, check out this Yahoo news report.

And for the record, check out this 2009 post from The Washington Examiner concerning AARP's central role in the liberal Democratic lobbying machine in the nation's capital.

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