An Internet glitch?

 

A funny thing happened yesterday afternoon as I was writing my column for today’s Examiner. My subject was the gloomy outlook for job creation, and I wanted to check out what my friend Bill Galston had to say about it. Galston, who was deputy domestic policy adviser in the Clinton White House, is one of the smartest people I know and one of the most intellectually honest people I have ever encountered in Washington (and, no, you Washington-bashers, that’s not intended as faint praise). So I went to the New Republic’s website, clicked on William Galston and found a very interesting blogpost dated September 15 and entitled “Unemployment Numbers May Put Democrats Out of Work.” I carefully copied the second sentence in his last paragraph and, with appropriate quotation marks and attribution, made it the first sentence of my penultimate paragraph.
 
I clicked onto another website, then decided I wanted to print out Galston’s blogpost to make sure I had quoted him accurately. And suddenly it wasn’t there; the latest post was dated September 8. I kept trying as the afternoon went on, but couldn’t come up with the post. I started to concoct conspiracy theories. Had the New Republic webmasters suppressed the blogpost? Not likely: the New Republic, admirably, features many intelligent writers with a wide variety of opinions. Finally, I decided that I had copied the quote carefully enough to rely on it.

 

This morning I clicked on William Galston and the September 15 blogpost appeared. So this was probably just some kind of innocent glitch. But a tad curious nonetheless. Anyway, Galston’s blogpost is worth reading in its entirety, as is everything he writes.

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