Americans still hate Obama's plan to bring Gitmo prisoners to U.S.

Last May, Gallup asked poll respondents, “Do you think the Unites States should — or should not — close [Guantanamo] and move some of the prisoners to U.S. prisons?” At the time, 65 percent of respondents opposed the plan to close Guantanamo, while 32 percent supported it.

Fast forward seven months. The Obama administration has decided to try Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in New York and has just announced it will bring other Guantanamo inmates to a souped-up prison in Illinois. So Gallup has taken another poll. And the results are…virtually the same as in May.

In the new survey, 64 percent say they oppose bringing Guantanamo inmates here, while 30 percent support it.

The president doesn't even have a majority of his own party on his side. In the new poll, 50 percent of Democrats support bringing Guantanamo prisoners to the U.S., while just 28 percent of independents and eight percent of Republicans do.

Opposition to Obama's policy is spread evenly across the country. Gallup found that 65 percent of people in the East, 60 percent of people in the Midwest, 67 percent of people in the South, and 64 percent of people in the West oppose bringing the prisoners to the United States.

The majorities opposing Obama on the Guantanamo issue are even larger than those that oppose him on national health care. And that could be decisive. Gallup notes that Obama will need the approval of Congress to bring the Gitmo prisoners here. “Congressional lawmakers voting on the plan to bring terrorist suspects now housed at Guantanamo to the U.S. will generally be doing so in the context of significant opposition from their constituents,” Gallup concludes, “thus potentially reducing the chances that the president will be able to get quick House and Senate approval for his proposal.”

Beltway ConfidentialObamaPoliticsUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A nurse draws up a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Mission neighborhood COVID-19 vaccine site on Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF expands vaccine eligiblity, but appointments ‘limited’

San Francisco expanded eligibility for COVID-19 vaccinations Wednesday but appointments remain limited… Continue reading

The now-shuttered Cliff House restaurant overlooks Ocean Beach people at Ocean Beach on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Perceived supply and demand in the Bay Area’s expensive rental market can play a big part in determining what people pay. (Shutterstock)
Bay Area rental market rebound — why?

Hearing about people leaving town can have as big an effect as actual economic factors

Federal legislation would require more highway funding to go toward bike lanes, bus stops and street safety improvements. (Shutterstock)
Federal legislation would direct more money toward street safety

Safe street infrastructure might soon become a national priority, pending passage of… Continue reading

The United Educators of San Francisco rallied in front of City Hall Saturday for a candlelight vigil after several days of contract negotiations. (Samantha Laurey/Special to SF Examiner)
Teachers call for outside mediator as contract talks over school schedule continue

Union remains at odds with SFUSD over hours students should be in the classroom

Most Read