After failing to stop terrorist attempt, government cracks down on … journalists?

While many have feared that TSA's recent failure will result in harsher screening for everyone else, it has also resulted in harsher dealings with the press. Two bloggers who published a security document have been visited by government agents demanding they reveal a source. From Wired:

“They’re saying it’s a security document but it was sent to every airport and airline,” says Steven Frischling, one of the bloggers. “It was sent to Islamabad, to Riyadh and to Nigeria. So they’re looking for information about a security document sent to 10,000-plus people internationally. You can’t have a right to expect privacy after that.”

Transportation Security Administration spokeswoman Suzanne Trevino said in a statement that security directives “are not for public disclosure.”

“TSA’s Office of Inspections is currently investigating how the recent Security Directives were acquired and published by parties who should not have been privy to this information,” the statement said.

Speaking of priorities, it's interesting to see that the crackdown we're seeing is on American bloggers. Way to get on the ball, TSA.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

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