A quick encounter with POTUS

President Obama's stitches came out today (see photo). He made a joke about it yesterday, urging reporters and photographers in the Oval Office to watch their equipment around Vice President Joe Biden, who was sitting on the couch.

“Don't hit him,” Obama said. “We already got one fat lip in the administration.”

The pool today encountered the president quite by surprise outside of the Roosevelt Room, where the White House was conducting a private, invite-only briefing on tax issues for a small group of reporters. From the pool report:

“Hey guys, what are you doing here?” Potus said, shaking hands all around.

“We're here all the time,” said CBS Radio's Mark Knoller.

Talk of stitches, which were removed today with no noticeable damage.

Someone asked about the World Cup decision, which left the US in the cold. “I think it was the wrong decision,” but he said he's confident the US team will acquit themselves well wherever it is. 

We were then whisked away, with a few reporters tapping away furiously at their Blackberrys before they were confiscated at the door.

World Cup decision? Oh. Got it.

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