40-year-old note left on Sequoia summit creates link between men

In 1972 Superior Court Judge Timothy B. Taylor

In 1972 Superior Court Judge Timothy B. Taylor

A man, his son and grandson climbed a California mountain peak with no name, but there was one on a 40-year-old note they found there.

The note read: “Tim Taylor climbed to this peak, Thursday, August 17, 1972. Age 13 years. Anyone finding this note please write.”

The three were on an 11-day trip to Sequoia National Park last month when t

In 1972 Superior Court Judge Timothy B. Taylor, then age 13 and far from his career in law, left a note on an unnamed summit in Sequoia National Park only to have it found by a couple 40 years later.

hey climbed a Sierra Nevada summit that appears nameless on maps. At the top, the trio came across a rusted canister stuffed with the teenager's note.

Larry Wright, 69, who found the note, and his wife, Cindy, didn't have to talk to too many reporters before locating Taylor. It turns out he is San Diego County Superior Court Timothy B. Taylor. Appointed to the bench in 2005 to handle criminal, civil and family law cases, he was elected to a six-year term in 2006.

Taylor lived with his family in La Canada Flintridge when he'd taken the trip in the Sierra Nevada as a teenager and left the note.

He's married to a bankruptcy judge who he said got a laugh out of the buzz the note caused.

Taylor said he's gotten about 50 calls about his old note.

“The whole thing has been great,” he said.

Taylor said he remembered the day vividly. After planting the note on his solo venture, he returned to base camp and caught grasshoppers and “epic trout” with fellow Scouts.

It also wasn't the only note he ever left behind, he said. “Whenever (my family) would go to Catalina, my dad would have us put a note in a bottle,” he said. “It's kind of the same idea.”

Wright, an avid hiker, said he'd been through the area several times. “The first time I had been in this area was in 1979, seven years after Tim left the note,” Wright said.

On Sept. 8, he was with his son Aaron and grandson Skyler.

Taylor said he believes the peak has been unnamed long enough.

He suggests calling it “Taylor-Wright Peak.”

newsSierra NevadaSuperior Court Judge Timothy B. TaylorUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Police Chief Bill Scott on Wednesday said a rebranding and reoganization of the former Gang Task Force amounts to “more than just the name change.” (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Faced with surge in shootings, Chief Scott reenvisions SFPD’s Gang Task Force

New Community Violence Reduction Team adds officers with community-policing experience

Stores including Walgreens and Safeway are required to pay their employees additional hazard pay under a city ordinance that is currently set to expire later this month. (Shutterstock)
Grocery workers could gain additional weeks of $5 per hour hazard pay

San Francisco will vote next week on whether to extend a law… Continue reading

The fatal shooting of San Francisco resident Roger Allen by Daly City police on April 7 prompted protests in both cities. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Daly City approves body-worn and vehicle cameras for police after fatal shooting

Daly City officials on Wednesday approved body and vehicle cameras for police… Continue reading

Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays attends an event to honor the San Francisco Giants' 2014 World Series victory on Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)
Willie Mays turns 90: San Francisco celebrates the greatest Giant

By Al Saracevic Examiner staff writer I couldn’t believe it. Willie Mays… Continue reading

Ja’Mari Oliver, center, 11, a fifth grader at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, is surrounded by his classmates at a protest outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 in support of him following an April 26 incident where he was falsely accused by an employee of stealing. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
School community rallies behind Black classmate stopped at Safeway

‘When you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us’

Most Read