10 states sue over restrooms transgender students can use

In this photo taken Thursday, July 7, 2016, Joseph Backholm, right, executive director of the Family Policy Institute of Washington, holds signed Initiative 1515 petitions just turned into him while he jokes with Yes Segura, of the LGBTQ Allyship, following Segura's group's attempt to confront supporters of proposed Initiative 1515, in Lynnwood, Wash. Supporters of the initiative that sought to repeal a state rule allowing transgender people to use the bathroom of the gender with which they identify failed to gather the required amount of signatures by a Friday deadline and the measure won't appear on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

LINCOLN, Neb. — Ten states sued the federal government Friday over rules requiring public schools to allow transgender students to use restrooms conforming to their gender identity, joining a dozen other states in the latest fight over LGBT rights.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Nebraska and included nine other states: Arkansas, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, North Dakota, Ohio, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

The filing comes after 11 states sued in May over the same Obama administration directive. North Carolina officials also sued the federal government in May over the same issue. Vast sums of federal funding are at stake: Money could be withheld from public schools that refuse to comply with the federal directive.

Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson said in a news release that the U.S. Education Department and Justice Department have circumvented established law and the process for changing existing laws.

“It also supersedes local school districts’ authority to address student issues on an individualized, professional and private basis,” the release said.

The battle that began to take shape when officials in Charlotte passed a sweeping anti-discrimination ordinance that included a provision allowing transgender people to use restrooms that correspond to their gender identity. North Carolina lawmakers passed a law nullifying that ordinance and banning others like it.

Soon after, the Justice Department said the law violated the federal Civil Rights Act and said it couldn’t be enforced. U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch has said North Carolina’s law requiring transgender people to use public restrooms and showers corresponding to the gender on their birth certificate amounts to “state-sponsored discrimination” and is aimed at “a problem that doesn’t exist.”

The Nebraska lawsuit hinges on the terms “sex” and “gender identity,” saying federal law uses only the term “sex.”

“Neither the text nor the legislative history of Title IX supports an interpretation of the term “sex” as meaning anything other than one’s sex as determined by anatomy and genetics,” the lawsuit says.lawsuitTransgenderUS

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