Resolve to Protect Your Eyes in 2019 With These Tips

There’s no way around it: technology is part of our daily lives. From our phones, to our computers, to our tablets, and everything else that is available to use, humans today are getting more screen time than ever before.

And there are no signs of this trend slowing down.

Apps like Moment and Screen Time have shot to the top of the App store, as adults are recognizing this overuse of screens, and want to cultivate awareness of how much they’re actually using their phones and other devices in attempt to reduce it.

And yes, this problem is affecting adults, but increased screen time as the norm has even more negative impacts on children. According to Screenfree.org, children with 2 or more hours of daily screen time are more likely to have “increased psychological difficulties, including hyperactivity, emotional and conduct problems, and difficulties with peers.” 2 hours doesn’t even appear to be that a lot of per day, however overtime it adds up.

Furthermore, this screen time indulgence in adolescents can create significant learning problems down the road. Also according to Screenfree.org, adolescents who watch 3 or more hours of television daily are at especially high risk forpoor homework completion, negative attitudes toward school, poor grades, and long-termacademic failure.”

And not to mention the effect that all this screen time has to do on our physical bodies, specifically our eyes. In fact, due to increase technology usage (as well as some other factors) we are currently in the middle of a world-wide epidemic of myopia, or nearsightedness. According to Science Daily, since 1971, the incidence of short sightedness within the US nearly doubled, to 42%, and this variety is even higher within the continent of Asia.

Yes, there are other factors that are contributing to poorer eye health, such as increased studying and reading, and other associated school activities, but it’s clear that screen time is becoming a major issue for our eye health.

Resolve to to protect your eyes (and your family member’s eyes) in 2019 with these tips.

Start using reading glasses

Even if you don’t have a prescription or wear glasses at all, chances are, you could benefit from using reading glasses regularly. According to ReadingGlasses.com, reading glasses are “non-prescription lenses that can make it easier to read comfortably by magnifying the text on the page.” This both reduces eye strain and allows you to carry your book or favorite magazine nearer than associate degree arm’s length away.

While you may think that reading glasses are just for people who are far-sighted, they are becoming more and more popular with the general public today. This is because many eye doctors are prescribing light-grade reading glasses to people who have perfect vision, or who may even already be near-sighted, and using some sort of existing prescription.

The fact is that using our eyes all day exhausts them, especially when we spend a lot of time focused on a computer screen, a text book, or even our phone. Many eye doctors are now recommending the use of low-grade readers at a certain point in the day, maybe in the afternoon after you’ve been using your computer screen for a while, to help give your eyes a break. This helps to prevent eye strain the the likelihood that more serious eye issues will arise down the road.

Try using blue light glasses

Blue light glasses, or protective screen glasses, are becoming more and more popular in homes and offices these days. These kinds of glasses facilitate to attenuate potential injury from the blue lightweight that comes from laptop screens and alternative major technology sources. And retailers are jumping on the trend to provide useful, but also trendy, fashionable blue light-blocking glasses.

One such retailer is Firmoo, an online eyeglasses retailer that specializes in customized, affordable eyeglasses. Firmoo’s glasses boast hundreds of styles that will suit the majority of face shapes, and are made with specially-made coating that blocks harmful blue light without noticeable color distortion. You can also get your computer glasses from Firmoo with your prescription built in – one of the many customizations that they offer within their products.

Just Posted

The admissions process at the academically competitive Lowell High School is set to change this year due to coronavirus restritions. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Lowell’s selective admissions process put on hold this year — and more changes may be in the works

School board votes unanimously to use normal student assignment lottery for competitive school

Dr. Vincent Matthews, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, said Tuesday that student would not be back in school before the end of this calendar year. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Superintendent: City schools will not reopen before the end of the year

San Francisco public schools won’t reopen to students for the rest of… Continue reading

San Francisco will allow bars selling drinks, and not food, to begin serving customers outdoors under health guidelines going into effect next month. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF becomes first Bay Area County to move to least restrictive COVID-19 category

Change to ‘yellow’ will allow more indoor dining and fitness, reopening non-essential offices

City officials want to install more red light cameras but the process is costly and time consuming. (Shutterstock)
Transit officials push for more red light cameras

SFMTA says ‘capital crunch’ and dragging timelines make expanding the program cumbersome

Police release an image a cracked windshield on a Prius that Cesar Vargas allegedly tried to carjack. Vargas, who was shot by police a short time later, can be seen in videos jumping on the windshield and pushing a Muni passenger who disembarked from a bus. (Courtesy SFPD
SFPD releases videos of deadly police shooting

Cesar Vargas killed after reports of carjacking with knife

Most Read