PBS has suspended the distribution of Charlie Rose's show following accusations of sexual assault by eight women.  (Erik Pendzich/Rex Shutterstock/Zuma Press/TNS)

PBS has suspended the distribution of Charlie Rose's show following accusations of sexual assault by eight women. (Erik Pendzich/Rex Shutterstock/Zuma Press/TNS)

Veteran TV host Charlie Rose accused of sexually harassment, suspended

Eight women have come forward with allegations that longtime television host Charlie Rose exposed himself to them, groped their breasts, buttocks and genital areas and made sexually charged phone calls over the course of more than 10 years.

In extensive interviews with the Washington Post, the women recounted how Rose made unwanted sexual advances while they worked or aspired to work on Rose’s namesake PBS show between the late 1990s and as recently as 2011.

Ranging in age from 21 to 37, five of the women spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation from the veteran TV host. The women’s allegations have striking similarities, describing how Rose alternated between anger and flattery.

Rose, 75, who also co-hosts “CBS This Morning” and contributes to “60 Minutes,” apologized for his “inappropriate behavior” but insisted the incidents were consensual.

“It is essential that these women know I hear them and that I deeply apologize,” Rose said in a statement. “I am greatly embarrassed. I have behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate. I always felt that I was pursuing shared feelings, even though I now realize I was mistaken.”

PBS has said they are suspending the distribution of Rose’s show.

MANSON’S FAILED MUSIC CAREER

Convicted killer Charles Manson, it turns out, was a failed folk rock artist who desperately sought the attention of a Los Angeles music scene.

He didn’t get it, and that rejection by insiders including the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson and record producer Terry Melcher helped ignite Manson’s rage.

Called “Lie: The Love and Terror Cult,” Manson’s only album was released in 1970, the year after his horrific killing spree.

Most notably, the album features a Manson-penned song titled “Cease to Exist,” which became the center of a dispute between him and the Beach Boys after the band reworked the song, changing lyrics, the tone and renaming it “Never Learn Not to Love.”

The Beach Boys issued “Never Learn Not to Love” in early December 1968. Manson was said to be furious that the Beach Boys hadn’t credited him for his work.

Within months of the release, Manson’s family had stolen some of Beach Boys’ Dennis Wilson’s gold records, totaled his Mercedes and cost him a reported $100,000.

By law, Manson wasn’t allowed to collect royalties — those are supposed to go to victims’ families — but a number of well-known and respected artists have used Manson’s music and image for shock value, including Redd Kross, the Lemonheads, G.G. Allin and Guns N’ Roses.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Singer Carly Rae Jepsen is 32  … TV host Michael Strahan is 46 … Singer Bjork is 52 … Actress Goldie Hawn is 72.

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