Students learning to use technology for good

Students learning to use technology for good

Students learning to use technology for good

Seventy-two years ago, computer scientist Grace Hopper was experiencing issues with her computer when she realized a moth was the source of the problem. Thus, the term “debugging” was coined to refer to resolving challenges in computing.

Thirty years ago, I taught Computer Science at George Washington Carver Elementary School.

This week, thousands of SFUSD students are celebrating Computer Science Education Week, which coincides with Grace Hopper’s birthday.

Put simply, computer science is the study of computers and algorithmic processes, their principles, their designs, their applications, and their impact on society. The most important takeaway for students is gaining insight into how to use the power of computers to solve big problems.

At SFUSD, we recognize the importance of computer science education even if students don’t plan to pursue computer science as a career path. Computer science teaches problem solving and important skills like communication, collaboration, and design. Computer Science can open the door to tremendous career opportunities within the technology sector while also being part of a well rounded education.

Computer science is increasingly important in today’s world and is just one way we’re redefining school in San Francisco as we prepare students for a rapidly changing world. SFUSD is the first large, urban school district in the U.S. to develop and implement a comprehensive pre-K to 12 computer science curriculum. The number of students participating in computer science instruction has dramatically increased since 2013-14, currently reaching about half of the 54,000 students in SFUSD.

All of our students this week will be celebrating computer science, demystifying code, exploring impacts of computing, and giving it a try!

This year’s CS Ed Week theme is Computer Science for Good, inspired by the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. Students are encouraged to consider how computer science can be used to address the world’s challenges as technology and computer science will be key to solving problems big and small.

No matter what subject or grade level your student is in, they can participate! Many activities related to the fundamentals of CS don’t even require computers. If you want to know what your children are learning, our lessons and activities are available at CSinSF.org/CSEdWeek.

Vincent Matthews is the superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District. He is a guest columnist.

Just Posted

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

National Weather Service flood watch in the San Francisco Bay Area for Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021. (National Weather Service via Bay City News)
Storm pounds Bay Area, leaving over 145,000 without power: Closures and updates

Torrential rainfall causes flooding, triggers evacuations in burn areas

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Most Read