Susan Williams, pictured with Robin Williams in 2009, opened up about her husband’s final days on “Good Morning America.” {Matt Sayles/AP)

Susan Williams, pictured with Robin Williams in 2009, opened up about her husband’s final days on “Good Morning America.” {Matt Sayles/AP)

Scoop: Susan Williams opens up about her husband’s tragic death

Susan Williams, Robin Williams’ widow, has broken her silence about her husband’s death — with some sad, and enlightening, comments.

“It’s the best love I ever dreamed of,” she said in an interview with Amy Robach on Tuesday’s “Good Morning America.”

She broke down in tears when Robach asked her if the actor was “spiraling out of control” before his death at 63 in August 2014, and described the trauma of seeing him in their Tiburon home: “I just screamed, ‘Robin what happened? What did you do?’” (The Marin County coroner stated Williams’ death was caused by asphyxia and hanging.)

And Williams said to People, “It was not depression that killed Robin,” she said, but frustration over the debilitating symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, in which microscopic protein deposits develop in the brain.

She told People, “One of the doctors said, ‘Robin was very aware that he was losing his mind and there was nothing he could do about it.’”

Williams, who was married to the beloved Oscar-winning actor-comedian for three years, said her husband was keeping it together as best he could. “But the last month he could not. It was like the dam broke,” she said.

In the last week of his life, he was planning to go to a facility for neurocognitive testing.

Williams said her husband, who spoke publicly about his addiction, depression and time in rehab, was “completely clean and sober” when he died, and had eight years of sobriety.

Calling depression “a small piece of the pie of what was going on,” Williams said Robin’s anxiety was huge.

When asked if she thought his suicide was his way of taking back control, Williams answered, “In my opinion, oh, yeah. … I mean, there are many reasons. Believe me. I’ve thought about this. Of what was going on in his mind, what made him ultimately commit — you know, to do that act. And I think he was just saying, ‘No.’ And I don’t blame him one bit. I don’t blame him one bit.”

QUICK TAKES

Salonniere, a website dedicated to “the art of party hosting,” named San Francisco socialites Susan Mactavish Best, Ken Fulk, Vanessa Getty, Denise Hale, Pamela Joyner, Jillian Manus, Jay Jeffers and Michael Purdy, Charlotte Mailliard Shultz and Alexis Swanson Traina among the top 100 hosts in the country.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

TV personality Bethenny Frankel is 45. … Rapper-producer Diddy (Sean Combs) is 46. … Actor Matthew McConaughey is 46. … TV host Jeff Probst is 54. … Actor Ralph Macchio is 54. … Actress Kathy Griffin is 55. … Singer-guitarist Chris Difford of Squeeze is 61. … Former First Lady Laura Bush is 69. … Actress Loretta Swit is 78. … Actress Doris Roberts is 85.

— Wire report

Got scoops or Bay Area celebrity gossip? Email scoop@sfexaminer.com.

Amy RobachGood Morning AmericaLewy Body DementiaRobin WilliamsSusan Williams

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