Scoop: Facebook’s No. 2 exec pays tribute to single mothers

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg said in a touching Mother's Day weekend Facebook post that until her husband's death she never realized how hard it is to be a single parent. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg said in a touching Mother's Day weekend Facebook post that until her husband's death she never realized how hard it is to be a single parent. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

Facebook’s No. 2 executive Sheryl Sandberg says she never realized how hard it is to be a single parent until her husband died a year ago.

In a touching Mother’s Day weekend post on Facebook, Sandberg says the odds are stacked against single moms. Many live in poverty, work two jobs or don’t get paid leave to care for themselves or children if they get sick, she says.

“I did not really get how hard it is to succeed at work when you are overwhelmed at home,” Sandberg wrote.

She called on leaders to rethink public and corporate policies to better support single mothers. She didn’t say whether anything will change at Facebook, where she is chief operating officer.

Sandberg’s husband, Dave, died in a treadmill accident a year ago while on vacation in Mexico.

Lauryn Hill apologizes

Musician Lauryn Hill says she will ‘make it up’ to fans angry that she arrived over two hours late to an Atlanta concert Friday night and performed for fewer than 40 minutes.

Hill wrote on her Facebook page Sunday that she doesn’t show up to shows late because she doesn’t care, but because of the artistic process. The challenge, she said, is aligning her energy with the time.

The concert was held at Atlanta’s Chastain Park Amphitheatre, which has an 11 p.m. noise curfew. Many in attendance expressed their outrage about the situation on social media.

In the note, Hill said that she will announce details of how she will make it up as she has them.

Hill’s rep did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Serena dances for Beyonce

Beyonce told Serena Williams to dance and the tennis champion let loose.

Top-ranked Williams recounted Sunday how she came to have a part in the singer’s video, “Lemonade.”

Williams says, “I have known the director since I was like nine years old. I know Beyonce pretty well, so they were like, ‘We would love for you to be in this particular song. It’s about strength and it’s about courage and that’s what we see you as.’”

Williams’ appearance came on the song “Sorry,” which features Beyonce showing her man the stupidity of his cheating ways.

Williams says, “She told me that she just wants me to dance, like just be really free and just dance like nobody’s looking and go all out. So that wasn’t easy in the beginning, but then it got easier. … I thought that particular song on the visual album was really a strong song, and it was also really fun at the same time.”

Happy birthday

Actress Grace Gummer (“American Horror Story,” ”The Newsroom”) is 30. … Actress Rosario Dawson is 37. … Musician Andrew W.K. is 37. … Rapper Ghostface Killah of Wu-Tang Clan is 46. … Singer David Gahan of Depeche Mode is 54. … Bassist Tom Petersson of Cheap Trick is 66. … Singer Billy Joel is 67.

BeyoncéDave SandbergFacebookLauryn HillMark ZuckerbergSerena WilliamsSheryl SandbergTreadmill accident

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