Scoop: Dr. Phil sues tabloid over spousal abuse articles

“Dr. Phil” McGraw and The National Enquirer are lining up for a courtroom brawl after the television talk show host and his wife filed a $250 million lawsuit against the supermarket tabloid and its sister publications, charging that they falsely accused him of being an abusive husband and a hypocrite who doesn’t practice what he preaches.

The lawsuit was filed last week in Palm Beach County, Fla., against the Enquirer, its owner American Media Inc. and sister publications, Star Magazine and the website Radar Online. According to the suit, the publications damaged McGraw’s reputation by falsely accusing the TV psychologist of physically and verbally abusing his wife, Robin. The articles also said that Robin McGraw tolerated the abuse and that the couple are getting divorced. The suit also says the Enquirer threatened to run a false story accusing McGraw of busting a man’s head with a beer mug during a drunken melee while in college in the early 1970s.

The suit says such allegations unjustly harm the McGraws’ reputation as outspoken opponents of spousal abuse. It adds that Robin McGraw started a foundation aimed at helping battered spouses and that the couple’s marriage is solid.

McGraw, 65, hosts the popular “Dr. Phil” talk show, where the booming-voiced Texan is known for passing out folksy advice to guests with various problems.

Pokemon No!

The “Pokemon Go” craze across the U.S. has people wandering into yards, driveways, cemeteries and even an off-limits police parking lot in search of cartoon monsters, prompting warnings that trespassers could get arrested or worse, if they cross paths with an armed property owner.

Since the release of the smartphone game last week, police have gotten a flurry of calls from residents about possible burglars or other strangers prowling the neighborhood.

So far, few tickets have been issued, and there have been no reports of arrests or assaults on trespassers playing the game.

Prince estate news

A Minnesota law firm may have “potentially relevant” information for determining who should inherit Prince’s estate, a judge said in an order released Wednesday that didn’t hint at what that information might be.

Carver County Judge Kevin Eide gave permission to Minneapolis law firm Henson & Efron, which formerly represented Prince, to privately share its information with Bremer Trust, the special administrator overseeing Prince’s estate.

Happy birthday!

Singer Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons is 29. … Actress Missy Gold (”Benson”) is 46. … Singer-comedian Kyle Gass of Tenacious D is 56. … Actor Harry Dean Stanton is 90.

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