Prince performs at the

Prince performs at the

Prince reportedly died with an ‘exceedingly high’ level of fentanyl in his blood

It’s been nearly two years since the sudden passing of music legend Prince, and a toxicology report is shedding new light on the circumstances of his death.

The Associated Press reported on Monday that the confidential toxicology document revealed the “concentration of fentanyl in Prince’s blood was 67.8 micrograms per liter.” Fatalities associated with the drug have been documented in individuals with blood levels ranging from three to 58 micrograms per liter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 to
100 times more potent than morphine.

Prince was found dead in his Minnesota home at age 57 on April 21, 2016.

“The amount in his blood is exceedingly high, even for somebody who is a chronic pain patient on fentanyl patches,” Dr. Lewis Nelson, chairman of emergency medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, told the AP.

While a public autopsy report that the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office in Minnesota released six weeks after the singer’s death stated that it was an accidental overdose, the specific fentanyl level was previously unknown.

The news comes a week after the Carver County Attorney’s Office announced that the Anoka County District Court had ordered the release of the full autopsy report to lawyers for Prince’s next of kin.

The decision was made to allow for the exploration of a possible wrongful death lawsuit within the statute of limitations. A civil suit would exist wholly outside of the ongoing criminal investigation.

DANCING QUEEN IS OUT

“Dance Moms” star Abby Lee Miller is free to be a dancing queen once again — she’s out of jail.

The one-time reality star, 51, was released from federal prison on Tuesday and is headed to a halfway house in California, according to multiple reports.

Miller is not entirely off the hook, though, as she’s still required to obey a strict set of rules, including a set of drug tests and meetings with her probation officer.

Miller’s early release from the Victorville Federal Correctional Institution in California comes eight months after she was locked up in July for bankruptcy fraud.

In a January Instagram post that has since been deleted, the ex-Lifetime reality star lamented the trust she placed in “the wrong people,” which she says landed her behind bars.

Miller rose to fame in 2011, when “Dance Moms” premiered on Lifetime, highlighting her Pittsburgh-area dance studio. She quit the show dramatically via Instagram last
summer.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Singer Lady Gaga is 32 … Actress Julia Stiles is 37 … Actor Vince Vaughn is 48… Rapper Salt of Salt-N-Pepa is 52 … Country singer Reba McEntire is 63.

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