Courtesy photoThousands of handmade items are for sale at the annual San Mateo Harvest Festival this weekend.

Courtesy photoThousands of handmade items are for sale at the annual San Mateo Harvest Festival this weekend.

Plentiful art, entertainment at San Mateo Harvest Festival

The Hollywood Beetles and Mrs. Claus are coming to the San Mateo Harvest Festival.

Along with plentiful offerings from 250 artisans, the annual event this weekend at the San Mateo County Event Center is serving up music, family-friendly comedy and variety entertainment.

Comedienne Sue “Big Mama Sue” Kroninger, who says she “loves down-home, all-American events,” appears as Mrs. Claus, strolling through the crowd and singing holiday classics with her assistant Eddie the Elf.

Mark Lovelis, founding member of the Hollywood Beetles, says his group’s act — “what a real tribute should be” — covers the Beatles’ different eras, complete with costume changes.

Comedian and “one-man variety show” John Park is known for his “funny waiter” sketch, packed with verbal and physical comedy, juggling, sleight of hand and a classic plate spinning routine. Park, who has been performing for 35 years, was one of the original street artists at Pier 39.

Organizers tout the festival as the largest indoor arts and crafts show on the West Coast, with more than 24,000 items handmade by more than 250 artists. Items for sale include art, pottery, glass, clothing, photography, jewelry, decor and homemade food. Guests also will have the opportunity to meet artists and purchase personalized products.

“The Harvest Festival started 41 years ago as a forum for independent artists to strive, and we continue that tradition today,” festival spokeswoman Liz Rosinski said. “Everything you will find at our show is made by hand in the United States.”

The festival also includes a grand prize drawing for a $5,000 ring and bracelet set by jeweler Randy Polk, as well as children’s activities and animal adoptions.

The Peninsula Humane Society/SPCA, the show’s selected charity, will receive half of the proceeds from shopping bags sold. The group also hosts a special mobile adoption unit on Saturday and Sunday.

IF YOU GO

San Mateo Harvest Festival

Where: San Mateo Event Center Expo Hall, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo

When: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday

Tickets: $4 to $9, free for children under 12

Contact: (415) 447-3205, www.harvestfestival.comartseventsHollywood BeetlesSan Mateo Harvest FestivalSue “Big Mama Sue” Kroninger

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