Anonymous 4, the New York-based a cappella group best known for performing medieval music, is touring in farewell concerts. (Courtesy Dario Acosta)

Anonymous 4, the New York-based a cappella group best known for performing medieval music, is touring in farewell concerts. (Courtesy Dario Acosta)

Oct. 19-20: Anonymous 4, Passport, Fuzz, Slash, Borodin Quartet, Vulfpeck


SUNDAY, OCT. 18

Anonymous 4: The acclaimed cappella group’s farewell season program “Anthology” includes ancient, traditional and modern works, [7 p.m.. St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 1111 O’Farrell St., S.F.]

Vulfpeck: The Los Angeles-based collective’s full-length debut “Thrill of the Arts” follows its controversial silent album “Sleepify” released on Spotify. [8 p.m., Slim’s, 333 11th St., S.F.]

Passport: The seventh annual event sponsored by the S.F. Arts Commission invites patrons to create their own limited-edition artist’s book by collecting original, artist-designed stamps in a customized notebook. [Noon to 4 p.m., Japantown Peace Plaza, near Post and Buchanan streets, S.F.]

Tamara Laurel: The singer-songwriter’s album “Runaway” blends country and folk, revealing influences from Emmylou Harris to Grace Potter. [8 p.m., Hotel Utah, 500 Fourth St., S.F.]

San Francisco Bach Choir: The choral group celebrates its 80th anniversary with a concert titled “The Gift of 1685: The Birth of Bach, Handel, & Scarlatti.” [4 p.m., First Unitarian Universalist Church, 1187 Franklin St., S.F.]

Fuzz: Los Angeles-based rockers Ty Segall (drums), Charles Moothart (guitar) and Chad Ubovich (bass) play from their new second album “II,” which they call “chaotically controlled, softly serpentine and blindingly barbaric.” [8 p.m., Chapel, 777 Valencia St., S.F.]

Slash: The rock guitar great is joined by Myles Kennedy & the Conspirators, who appeared on his most recent album “World on Fire.” [8 p.m., Warfield, 982 Market St., S.F.]

Berkeley Choro Ensemble: Bassoonist Paul Hanson joins flutist Jane Lenoir, guitarist Ricardo Peixoto, percussionist Brian Rice and clarinetist Harvey Wainapel in a concert that blends European classical music, ragtime and blues. [4 p.m., Old First Church, 1751 Sacremento St., S.F.]

Borodin Quartet: Music@Menlo presents the ensemble, founded in 1945 in the Soviet Union, in a concert of works by Borodin, Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky. [6 p.m., Center for Performing Arts at Menlo-Atherton, 555 Middlefield Road, Atherton]


MONDAY, OCT. 19

United Nations Association Film Festival: The feature documentary “Finding Hillywood,” about pioneers who bring local films to rural Rwandans on a giant inflatable movie screen, screens; the evening also includes a reception, film shorts and a panel discussion. [6:30 p.m., Ninth Street Independent Film Center, 145 Ninth St., S.F.]

Madonna: The pop icon brings her “Rebel Heart” tour to the South Bay. [8 p.m., SAP Center, 525 W. Santa Clara St., San Jose]

Michael Riedel: The New York Post commentator talks about the state of the theater and his juicy new book “Razzle Dazzle: The Battle For Broadway” in an event presented by Curran Under Construction. [7 p.m., 445 Geary St., S.F.]

Prisoners of Age: The exhibition of larger-than-life photos by Ron Levine taken over a period of 18 years chronicles elderly men and women at prisons and prison wards in the U.S. and Canada, [10 a.m. to 2 p.m., New Industries Building, Alcatraz]

A Silent Film: The U.K. duo’s poetic pop-rock sound has garnered comparisons to everyone from Coldplay to The Killers to U2. [8 p.m., Independent, 628 Divisadero St., S.F.]

Diane Lawson: The psychiatrist and author of “A Tightly Raveled Mind” appears in conversation with best-selling “Cutting for Stone” novelist-physician Abraham Verghese. [7:30 p.m., Kepler’s 1010 El Camino, Menlo Park]

Adam Johnson: The Stanford professor and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Orphan Master’s Son” discusses his new short story collection “Fortune Smiles” and its inspirations. [6:30 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 555 Post St., S.F.]

Anonymous 4Borodin QuartetFuzzPassportSlashVulfpeck

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