The San Francisco Unified School District measures its performance on a regular basis.  (Courtesy photo)

The San Francisco Unified School District measures its performance on a regular basis. (Courtesy photo)

Measuring how San Francisco schools are doing

Here at the San Francisco Unified School District, we discuss improving education every day. And on a regular basis we stop to take a closer look at how we’re going about it, and ask ourselves what’s working and what do we need to do differently.

But with all the variables that go into making schools great for every child, there is a lot to look at. That’s where a plan required by the State of California called the Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) comes in.

This is the LCAP in a nutshell: We identify our annual priorities for student success, put them into action, and then measure our progress. Then we use information about how things are working (or not) to update the next year’s plan.

The LCAP is not created by just a few people sitting in a room. It reflects the input gathered through many conversations with parents and educators as well as what researchers have learned about ways to address our most pressing challenges. We update it each year.

Some of our challenges

We have a large number of students who are learning English, and meeting their unique needs is one of the priorities in our LCAP. We look at multiple ways to provide extra support to students who struggle in school. And, because we know children aren’t learning if they aren’t attending school regularly, so improving attendance and reducing chronic absenteeism is a priority.

So, how are we doing?

To show you how our current LCAP is shaping up, I invite you to join us Wednesday night for an interactive public forum to see how SFUSD students are doing, ways that schools are supporting success, and how you can participate in the process. Light dinner, interpretation and child care will be provided.

Not only will we be looking at how we’re doing so far this year, we’ll also be sharing some of the strategies that ‘move the needle’ and where we need more work.

We’ll fill you in on other things we are measuring, the challenges we currently face to meet our LCAP goals, and what the goals and priorities actually look like in our schools.

Finally, we’ll be discussing how our LCAP influences our annual budget planning.

Learn more

More information about the LCAP can be found at www.sfusd.edu/budget

More information about how your school is doing can be found at https://www.caschooldashboard.org

Information and materials shared at the event will be posted at www.tinyurl.com/sfusd-data

If you go

SFUSD LCAP Task Force presents “SFUSD: Turning Data into Action”

Wednesday, Dec. 5 from 5:30-8pm

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School, 350 Girard St. @ Bacon St. (parking in the schoolyard – enter from Bacon St.)

Vincent Matthews is superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District.

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