COURTESY  PHOTOThe varied menu at Prime Dip in Pacifica offers sandwiches with tasty beef

COURTESY PHOTOThe varied menu at Prime Dip in Pacifica offers sandwiches with tasty beef

Many tasty sandwiches at Prime Dip and King’s

Sandwiches are the theme this week. Prime Dip, which has three San Francisco locations, has expanded to Pacifica, to a bright, renovated space formerly occupied by Boston Bill’s. Although the signature dish is a traditional roasted prime rib sandwich with horseradish and au jus, Prime Dip takes the dipping concept into new territory, with menu items such as lobster dip with dill butter, or fried chicken with apple cider cole slaw and tartar sauce. The indecisive can order a Surf and Turf Dip (half lobster, crab or shrimp, and half roast beef). Sandwiches, which may be customized with add-ons (such as jalapenos and cheese), come in two sizes. Clam chowder and seafood tacos with mango salsa and tomatillo sauce also are on the menu.

4408 Coast Highway, Pacifica; (650) 557-1246. Primedip.com

South San Francisco

French dip isn’t on the menu, but King’s Sandwich Co. in South San Francisco has other appealing choices, including eight creative King’s Specialties. The Seoul Train has Kurobuta ham, roasted pork, sambal spread and kim chi slaw, and the spicy Joe 74 is filled with oven roasted chicken, mesquite turkey, smoked gouda, jalapeno mayonnaise and a habanero spread. Patrons also may create their own masterpieces, choosing from a plentiful list of meats, cheese, produce, sauces and breads. How about black angus roast beef with sharp cheddar, avocado and chimichurri spread on sliced multi-grain bread? Sides include potato salad, pesto pasta salad and Hawaiian macaroni salad. Non-sandwich eaters can try entree sized salads: Caesar, chopped, Mediterranean or Southwest.

331 Baden Ave., South S.F.; (650) 273-1559, www.kingssandwichco.com

Burlingame

Diablo’s JJ Taqueria is a new casual Mexican food option in Burlingame. Carne asada, carnitas, chicken, lengua (beef tongue) or al pastor pork tacos, at $1.85 each, are the heart of the menu. Yet Diablo’s also is an all-day affair. Huevos rancheros and chilaquiles are served in the morning, and tamales, enchiladas and large meat plates are popular for dinner. Burritos, tortas, nachos, quesadillas, three salads and cheese rolls (similar to spanakopita’s phyllo dough-wrapped feta cheese) round out the menu. Don’t forget fresh homemade horchata to drink.

1302 Bayshore Highway, Burlingame; (650) 513-1706

Menlo Park

At the end of the year, Iberia Restaurant will leave Menlo Park, to accommodate a new office complex taking the place of its building, which faces demolition. The owners have signed an agreement for a new space in Belmont, and are planning to open a similar Spanish eatery soon after closing at their current location.

1026 Alma St., Menlo Park; (650) 325-8981. Iberiarestaurant.com

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