The New Zealand band Katchafire, a Maori group that performs original roots-reggae material, is bringing its summer tour to San Francisco. [8 p.m., Regency Ballroom, 1290 Sutter St., S.F.] (Courtesy photo)

The New Zealand band Katchafire, a Maori group that performs original roots-reggae material, is bringing its summer tour to San Francisco. [8 p.m., Regency Ballroom, 1290 Sutter St., S.F.] (Courtesy photo)

July 22: Katchafire, plankton appreciation and more

Who’s in town

Pokey LaFarge, whose material draws from early jazz, ragtime and country blues, is performing material from his new album, “Something in the Water.” [8 p.m., Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., S.F.]

Lectures

Enhancing humans: Technologist and sci-fi writer Ramez Naam is speaking about technology-related human enhancements. [7:30 p.m., SFJAZZ Center, 201 Franklin St., S.F.; visit longnow.org]

Mental illness: Psychiatrists Renee Binder, of UCSF, and Dominic Sisti, of the University of Pennsylvania, are debating whether people with severe mental illnesses should be integrated into society. [6:30 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 555 Post St., S.F.]

Cancer remission: Kelly Turner, author of “Radical Remission,” is speaking about her research into cases of recovery from cancer without the help of conventional medicine. [6 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 555 Post St., S.F.]

Taxi apps: The growth of Uber and other ride services, and how this technology has affected taxi drivers, is the subject of a LaborFest forum sponsored by San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance. [7 p.m., Redstone Building, 2940 16th St., S.F.]

Literary events

Crime novel: Best-selling crime novelist Don Winslow writes about corruption, revenge and justice spanning a decade of the Mexican-American drug wars in his new novel, “The Cartel.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 601 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Family tale: Annie Barrows tells the story of an inquisitive girl, her beloved aunt and a visitor who changes the course of their destiny in her new novel, “The Truth According to Us.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 1491 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley]

At the public library

Mystery writers: Crime novelists Juliet Blackwell, Gigi Pandian, Susan C. Shea and Kelli Stanley are taking part in a Sisters in Crime reading. [6:30 p.m., Latino/Hispanic Room, Main Library, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]

At the colleges

Human rights: United Nations rapporteur David Kaye is speaking about the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression. [7:30 p.m., Bishop Auditorium, Lathrop Library, Stanford University, 518 Memorial Way, Stanford]

Local activities

Trapeze artists: Les Aerielles, a troupe of aerial acrobats, are performing a “Trapeze Spectacular.” [12:30 and 1:30 p.m., Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley, 1 Centennial Drive, Berkeley]

Urban farming: Guests from Full Circle Farms are speaking about running an urban farm. [6:30 p.m., Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View]

Rock band: Moonalice, a psychedelic roots-rock band whose music contains extended improvisations and a dancey sound, is performing an outdoor concert. [6 p.m., Union Square, Geary and Powell streets, S.F.]

Oceanic microbes: Leading marine microbial ecologists are taking part in a special event focusing on plankton, tiny water organisms vital to life on Earth. [6:30-8:30 p.m., Exploratorium, Pier 15, S.F.; RSVP: exploratorium.edu]

Dog night: The Bay Street Emeryville shopping complex is hosting its weekly “Walk n’ Wag” event for dog owners and their pooches. The evening includes music, pet products, seminars and more.  [5:30-7:30 p.m., 5616 Bay St., Emeryville]

Roots reggae: The New Zealand band Katchafire, a Maori group that performs original roots-reggae material, is bringing its summer tour to San Francisco. [8 p.m., Regency Ballroom, 1290 Sutter St., S.F.]eventslocal activitesSan Franciscothings to do

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