Students returning to classrooms on April 12 should be prepared for open windows and a socially distanced setup. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Students returning to classrooms on April 12 should be prepared for open windows and a socially distanced setup. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Five things to know about getting back to in-person learning

Timely tips for SFUSD students returning to classrooms

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By Gabriela López

After much planning and work with our staff, educators and community partners, we are thrilled to invite our students back to in-person learning beginning on April 12 with more students returning throughout the month! Here are five things for students and families to better prepare.

1. Bring a bottle for water and remember you’ll have access to free lunch. We have water stations where you can refill and we will be providing free lunch for everyone. Although please remember that students can’t share food to prevent spreading germs.

2. Bring a sweater, layers and a mask. Many of our classrooms will be well ventilated, which may lead to some temperature changes. Masks are known to be the safest tool for preventing infection so remember to bring your favorite one.

3. Please bring your district computer. Our department of technology encourages students to bring their district-issued computer as this is the best way to be able to support all students with any technical challenges.

4. Not everyone is returning to in-person school. Classrooms are still one community, whether in-person or virtual, and we encourage everyone to continue to be supportive of each other during this transition. We are committed to a full return for every student by the fall.

5. We’re focusing on our students. Whether students are in-person or distance learning, we’ll be celebrating the conclusion of the school year together, no matter what. Our goal is to lift up the strength and resilience of our students.

We know returning to our school buildings are signs of hope for our students, their families and many of our community members. Together we can continue to get us all back safely.

Guest columnist Gabriela López is president of the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education.

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