For the new year, work on strengthening your muscles to guide your body motions.

For the new year, work on strengthening your muscles to guide your body motions.

Fit wishes for the New Year

May you be stronger.

Pretty much all of our ills are made worse by weakness.  Power developed

by strengthening  our muscle guides all of our body’s motions in efficient ways.

Weakness leaves us open to repeated injury. Power feels good, increasing the endorphins that induce bliss.

May you be more flexible.

Stiffness—a decreased range of motion of joints—causes strain on other body parts. Tight hamstrings lead to back pain.  Flexibility comes from stretching, swimming, Pilates, yoga and other sports that focus on expanding your range of motion.

May you be  coordinated.

Coordination and balance are diminished with aging and through lack of practice.  Pick up sports and activities that emphasize coordination…not video or VR games, but ballroom dancing, tai chi and ping-pong …

May you be calmer.

Meditation’s goal is to put space between your brain and your tongue.

Calming the mind will permit you make good decisions, say nice things and approach life in a less stressed way.

May you be  faster.

Faster in the athletic endeavors where you seek speed, and faster in making good decisions.  Processing speed can be trained, and muscles conditioned.  It takes effort to move and respond more quickly, and practice to do it well.

May you eat well.

High quality food comes from the ground, and we are very fortunate to have access to it.  Decisions about what to eat and when to eat it determine your health and sense of well-being as much as any other choice.  Choose well, and eat locally sourced, naturally grown and unprocessed foods.  Focus on protein, fruits and vegetables (and plain tap water) first, and let the other foods you enjoy be treats.

May you live well.

Each day educate yourself, contribute to the world, be a good person and

have fun.  These are our daily goals, and we share them with you in hopes they put sparkle in your life.

Happy New Year.

Dr. Kevin R. Stone is an orthopedic surgeon at The Stone Clinic and chairman of the Stone Research Foundation in San Francisco. He pioneers advanced orthopedic surgical and rehabilitation techniques to repair, regenerate and replace damaged cartilage and ligaments.

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