Elizabeth Andoh's taste of culture

Elizabeth Andoh, anthropologist, food journalist, and inspired cross-cultural explainer, can deepen any traveler's experience in Japan. After her talk to the San Francisco culinary delegation to Osaka, the food started making sense. Andoh came to Japan 40 years ago as an American graduate student and stayed. As an outsider who has become an ardent insider, she brings a perspective that solves the mysteries of Japan's customs for Westerners. A longtime New York Times and Gourmet magazine columnist, she runs A Taste of Culture (www.tasteofculture.com), a Tokyo and Osaka-based culinary arts program with a Web site rich in links that includes a charming online newsletter on seasonal food and life in Japan. Prepare for a trip by reading her cookbook “Washoku: Recipes from the Japanese Home Kitchen.” Once there, a cooking class followed by a meal in one of Andoh’s home kitchens in Osaka or Tokyo, or a food shopping tour, will set you on the path of rare enjoyment. WhenAndoh teaches, nothing, at least culinary, gets lost in translation.

HARUKO ITO: A GUIDE IN KANSAI

Multilingual Haruko Ito spent 25 years in the Osaka mayor’s office. She has just retired and is available to help private visitors to the Kansai region. Ask her to take you to the evocative Sumiya Museum in Kyoto, once an elegant 17th-century restaurant where a reservation and translator are required. Ms.Ito, with wit and intelligence, brings the scene alive. 

Contact Haruko Ito at GBE00703@nifty.com.

entertainmentFeaturesFood & DrinkFood and Wine

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

PG&E is locked in a battle with San Francisco city officials over the cost of connecting city projects using public power to the grid.<ins> (Courtesy photo)</ins>
SF challenges PG&E’s power moves

Utility uses expensive hookups to discourage public power use

Mayor London Breed said The City would pause reopening plans in order to “make sure we continue our cautious and deliberate approach.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
SF slows down reopening after COVID-19 cases rise

Restaurants no longer permitted to increase indoor dining capacity to 50 percent

Toilet (Shutterstock)
Table salt and poop: Testing for COVID-19 in S.F. sewage

The City’s sewers could provide an early warning of fresh outbreaks

A study published in the December 2016 Scientific Reports journal reveals that brain activity increases when people’s political beliefs are challenged. <ins>(Screenshot Scientific Reports)</ins>
Now is the time to make friends with enemies

We can be civil to others who have different political beliefs

Most Read