A revolutionary way to relieve pain

Physicians have long known that “the body electric” is for real: Tiny electrical currents and magnetic fields are constantly firing off inside you. We just haven’t known how to harness these forces for healing. But a handful of scientists and medical innovators have relentlessly pursued this.

They’re succeeding, using something few docs know much about. It’s not a new pill or operation; it’s magnets. Not the kind you stick on the fridge, but pulsating electromagnets. They produce invisible energy waves that increase blood flow and normalize some electrical impulses to and in nerves. One Food and Drug Administration-approved device — yep, they’re that far — relieves more than 50 percent of post-operative pain. Nobody appreciates what a godsend that is like an anesthesiologist (Dr. Mike) and a surgeon (Dr. Oz). Well, nobody except every surgery patient who’s woken up to a world of hurt. Called the Torino, this post-op pain zapper is so new that even MDs who’ve vaguely heard of it probably think it’s a new car.

How do devices that use a pulsed electromagnetic field relieve post-op pain and — you’re about to get as excited as we are — intractable back, neck, foot and arthritis pain? Your nerves, cartilage, spinal fluid, bones, muscles and blood all rely on a symphony of dancing ions. PEMFs activate these electrically charged particles in ways that seem to turn off inflammation and turn on cell repair.

PEMFs rev up production of nitric oxide, which increases blood flow to the targeted area. The combo stimulates an anti-inflammatory cascade that, in the Torino’s case, not only halves post-op pain but also reduces swelling and speeds healing.

PEMF therapy also coaxes badly broken bones to mend that otherwise might not. When you break something, electrical “injury” currents rush through your bone, signaling instructions for knitting it back together. But in nasty breaks, that process short-circuits. To re-create the currents, surgeons implant electrodes into mangled bones. Not much fun, plus you look like Frankenstein. Enter PEMF mats, bandages and knee braces, which stimulate healing currents. Aim PEMFs at the damaged zone for eight to 30 minutes, two to four times a day, and you’ll heal better, faster. Side effects? Zero, at least in the short term. The products are still too new to know whether there are long-term issues.

The YOU Docs — Mehmet Oz, host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen of Cleveland Clinic — are the authors of “YOU: Losing Weight.” For more information go to www.RealAge.com.

FeaturesHealthHealth & FitnessYouDocs

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The City is seeking to enhance health care for San Francisco International Airport workers, which include more than 100 who have tested positive for COVID-19. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Airlines, business groups fight new health insurance requirements for SFO workers

Heathy Airport Ordinance would require companies to offer family coverage or increase contributions

The Hall of Justice building at 850 Bryant St. is notorious for sewage leaks and is known to be seismically unsafe. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFPD speeding up Hall of Justice exit after another ‘large leak’

San Francisco police can’t get out of the decrepit Hall of Justice… Continue reading

The Telegraph Quartet is pictured during its SF Music Day 2020 recording session at the striking, beautifully lit and almost empty Herbst Theatre. (Courtesy Marcus Phillips)
SF Music Day goes virtual with Herbst broadcast

Performers pre-record sets in empty, iconic theater

Dr. Vincent Matthews, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, said Tuesday that student would not be back in school before the end of this calendar year. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Superintendent: City schools will not reopen before the end of the year

San Francisco public schools won’t reopen to students for the rest of… Continue reading

The admissions process at the academically competitive Lowell High School is set to change this year due to coronavirus restritions. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Lowell’s selective admissions process put on hold this year — and more changes may be in the works

School board votes unanimously to use normal student assignment lottery for competitive school

Most Read