Mayor Ed Lee joins city officials and the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus during an event held to show support of San Francisco's sanctuary city status at City Hall in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, November 14, 2016. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Mayor Lee emphasizes ‘we will always be San Francisco’

“We will always be San Francisco.”

Those were the words spoken by Mayor Ed Lee at unity gathering held at City Hall on Monday morning in response to President-elect Donald Trump’s victory at the polls last week.

SEE RELATED: Mayor Lee: SF will remain sanctuary city despite Trump presidency

At the unity rally, the mayor emphasized the need for The City to come together and deliver on its promises of being a welcoming city.

Lee stood with members of the Board of Supervisors, San Francisco Police Department and other community leaders in front of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus. About 300 people gathered on the floor and balconies of the City Hall Rotunda.

SEE RELATED: Trump’s triumph puts SF’s immigrant families, federal funding on the line

The San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus sang two songs and encouraged the gathering to join the chorus in a song sung at Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk’s memorial emphasizing the complex emotions of anger and love.

“We know that in our city there are people who are angry, fearful, and frustrated,” Lee said. “Our city has never been about that. Our city is a city of sanctuary, refuge and a city of love”.

Lee emphasized support of The City’s sanctuary policy and pledged to fight discriminations like never before. As the San Francisco Examiner has previously reported, Trump has vowed to revoke the funding on his first day in office in January, a pledge that could cost San Francisco more than $1 billion a year. As a sanctuary city, cooperation is limited between law enforcement in San Francisco and federal authorities.

The mayor also praised and asked citizens for their continued support of universal health care affordable housing and stressed the need for San Francisco to be “a beacon” to the rest of America of what true freedom really is.

“We have to speak to the next generation who are scared and fearful,” Lee said. “If we lose a friend in the White House…we’ll find other friends.”

“My heart is heavy, my heart is full of gratitude to The City and to the leaders.but also to the community to come together and reassure everybody that it is going to be okay,” said Mabel Aguilar, program coordinator for La Raza Community Resource Center.

“It’s going to be okay. It’s going to take a lot of work, but we’ll get through it.”

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