Sandra Lee Fewer poses for a portrait outside City Hall in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, September 26, 2016. Fewer declared victory in the District 1 supervisor race on Monday. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Sandra Lee Fewer poses for a portrait outside City Hall in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, September 26, 2016. Fewer declared victory in the District 1 supervisor race on Monday. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Fewer declares victory in District 1 supervisor race

Sandra Lee Fewer declared victory late Monday in the District 1 supervisor race over Marjan Philhour, the second-place candidate in what amounted to one of the most expensive supervisor races in the November election.

Fewer, a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, held the lead over nine other candidates since Election Day, but the race was previously too close to call.

SEE RELATED: D1 supervisor race: Philhour, Fewer battle to represent the Richmond

Fewer was leading by more than 1,400 votes Monday when Department of Election results showed there were just 1,584 ballots left to count. There were just 30,717 votes cast in the race for Richmond District supervisor.

“This victory is for our neighborhood,” Fewer said in a statement. “It’s a win for seniors on fixed incomes, immigrant households, longtime residents, and young families trying to build a life together in the Richmond District.”

Philhour’s campaign benefited from more than $1 million in contributions and third-party spending, compared to the more than $400,000 benefiting Fewer. Philhour was heavily backed by real estate and tech interests while Fewer had the support of unions.

Earlier in the day, Philhour conceded in an email to her supporters.

“The Department of Elections is nearing the end of the vote count, and we fell short of a win,” Philhour said. “While we won’t be going to City Hall in January, over the countless months of meeting neighbors and talking about the issues, we have created a real dialogue around keeping families and working people in the the Richmond.”

Just Posted

Salesforce Tower and several other buildings in downtown San Francisco can be seen through the fog; climate scientists report that The City’s beloved mascot may be on the decline. (Courtesy Engel Ching)
Is San Francisco losing its fog? Scientists fear the worst

This isn’t just an identity crisis for San Franciscans. It’s an ecological problem

Outside Lands boasts high-quality food and drink from dozens of purveyors, and many are local.<ins> (Courtesy Outside Lands)</ins>
Outside Lands is for food lovers

85 food vendors, 40 wineries, 30 breweries make the festival nourishing to gluttonous

California Highway Patrol officers watch as Caltrans workers remove barricades from homeless camp sites as residents are forced to relocate from a parking lot underneath Interstate 80 on Monday, May 17, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco’s broken promise to resolve homeless encampments

‘There is an idea that The City is leading with services, and they are not’

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at San Francisco’s Department of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Gabriela Lopez, Alison Collins and Faauuga Moliga were sworn in to the Board of Education on Jan. 7, 2019. The election date for their possible recall is Feb. 15, 2022. (Ida Mojadad/S.F. Examiner)
The silver lining of San Francisco’s ‘recall fever’

Recalls are an expensive but valuable amplifier for everyday people

Most Read