Fifth-grade students take cover during an earthquake drill at St. Finn Barr Catholic School, a private school in the Sunnyside neighborhood. (Mike Koozmin/2014 S.F. Examiner)

Fifth-grade students take cover during an earthquake drill at St. Finn Barr Catholic School, a private school in the Sunnyside neighborhood. (Mike Koozmin/2014 S.F. Examiner)

Mayor Lee urges disaster preparedness on 28th anniversary of Loma Prieta earthquake

Mayor Ed Lee on Tuesday, the 28th anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake, urged San Francisco residents to always be ready for disaster like a major earthquake to strike.

The quake, which struck Oct. 17, 1989, killed 63 people in Oakland, San Francisco and Santa Cruz, damaged 12,000 homes and 2,600 businesses, and caused an estimated $6 billion in damage.

“As we mark the 28th year anniversary of the devastating Loma Prieta earthquake today and reflect on the continuing tragedies of the North Bay fires, now, more than ever, we must work together to ensure that our communities are prepared for the occurrence of a major event,” the mayor said in a statement.

“Since the 1989 earthquake, San Francisco has engaged in an expansive undertaking to retrofit and rehabilitate our critical infrastructure. We have strengthened our buildings, homes, bridges and emergency response centers to make them more resilient, secure and durable.

“Still, we must always be prepared for the worst, which is why we are urging our residents to have an emergency plan in place and disaster supply kits in their homes. For more information on how to prepare for the next major event, individuals can visit www.sf72.org, San Francisco’s one-stop resource guide for disaster preparedness.

“In recent months, we have seen how tragedy can strike at any moment and render unthinkable consequences, affecting cities and towns across the world. We must be ready here in San Francisco.”

Bay City News Service contributed to this report.

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